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The Perfect Combination



Combination Therapy Promises to Improve AMD Care

The eye is one of the most valued and yet one of the most fragile organs in the body. A fact known all too well to people with potentially-blinding eye diseases like Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

AMD is a condition that affects the light sensitive layer in the back of the eye called the retina; specifically the portion of the retina responsible for central vision known as the macula. Proliferative (or wet) AMD, occurs when abnormal blood vessels begin forming which leak and cause swelling in the retina.

There are a number of AMD medications available, known as anti-VEFG or VEGF-trap, which stop the abnormal growth of these blood vessels. However, several recent studies have raised concerns about the longterm effectiveness of these medications alone.

Now, a new multi-center clinical trial called the Solaris Study is evaluating current AMD medications alone and in combination with Fovista (a platelet-derived growth factor medication) which may increase the effectiveness of anti-VEGF medication by making the abnormal blood vessels more susceptible to the treatment.

“The exciting part about it is that in the phase one and two trials, Fovista showed significant improvements above and beyond what is the standard of care already offered for treatment,” explained Dr. Ohr, the OSU site Principal Investigator.

If the trend seen in the first two phases of research continues, Fovista has the chance of providing more long-term options to patients and help them retain or maintain their vision.

“We’re hoping the results are going to be positive as they were on the phase 1 and 2 trials,” explained Dr. Ohr, “and if that’s the case then it will offer improvement upon what is already a pretty beneficial treatment for our patients.”

 

     

“The exciting part about it is that

in the phase one and two trials,

Fovista showed significant

improvements above and beyond

what is the standard of care

already offered for treatment...”

Click here for more information on current clinical trials